For Immediate Release

Church of Scientology Budapest Promotes Literacy

The Church of Scientology Budapest and Applied Scholastics of Hungary organized an education round table where they released the new brochure Scientology: How We Help—Applied Scholastics, Achieving Literacy and Education.

Photos

The Church of Scientology Budapest and Applied Scholastics of Hungary hosted a literacy and education round table April 24, 2013, to introduce community leaders to a technology capable of overcoming illiteracy and raising the standard of education.

Hungary traditionally holds education in high regard. A UNESCO country comparison finds Hungary among the most literate countries in the world, boasting a 99 percent adult literacy rate. According to the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), 86 percent of Hungarian 25-34 year olds have earned the equivalent of a high school degree—well above the average of other countries. Yet, the OECD also found an unusually wide discrepancy between the quality of education in the best and lowest-performing schools, and certain portions of the population, such as Roma students, rank far below the national average.

The round table briefed attendees on a breakthrough capable of resolving the country’s educational issues and ensuring every student has the skills to be able to learn and apply any subject—Study Technology.

Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard isolated the precise causes for the success or failure of any activity of study and an actual technology of learning with which to master any subject. These educational breakthroughs are collectively known as Study Technology.

In 1972, Applied Scholastics was founded in the United States to make these solutions broadly available. Applied Scholastics has grown into an international network of schools, programs and tutoring groups.

Round table guests heard from a teacher on what occurred when she implemented Study Technology on her class. Her students were tested before and after the program and showed a 90 percent increase in study ability after learning the basics of this technology.

 

Zsuzsanna Gaal, Director of Public Affairs of the Church of Scientology Budapest, briefed the round table on the Church of Scientology’s supports of educational reform and the Applied Scholastics program and how this aligns with The Aims of Scientology: “A civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war, where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights, and where man is free to rise to greater heights.”

 

Attendees were presented with copies of the new brochure, Scientology: How We Help—Applied Scholastics, Achieving Literacy and Education.

One guest, a 65-year-old police officer, realized why mathematics had always been difficult for him. He was surprised, at his age, to learn something new about study. Another, a sociologist, was eager to share the information he learned with his colleagues. The mayor of a nearby town found the round table thought-provoking and inspiring. He saw this as something that can benefit his constituents.

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The Church of Scientology published Scientology: How We Help—Applied Scholastics, Achieving Literacy and Education to meet requests for more information about the Scientology religion and its support of global humanitarian initiatives and social betterment programs. For more information, visit the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org/AppliedScholastics.

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Applied Scholastics International is a secular nonprofit public benefit corporation that addresses head-on the problem of illiteracy by making L. Ron Hubbard’s discoveries in the field of education and literacy broadly available. It has trained nearly 140,000 educators and has helped more than 39 million with Study Technology. The organization works with hundreds of affiliated schools and educational programs throughout the world, providing the effective learning tools developed by L. Ron Hubbard.

CONTACT:
Church of Scientology Media Relations
mediarelations@churchofscientology.net
(323) 960-3500 phone
(323) 960-3508 fax