FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Peace Bridge Spotlights Buffalo Special Police Commitment to Human Rights

International bridge between the U.S. and Canada glows blue and gold in a tribute to the Buffalo Special Police and their human rights advocacy.

The Buffalo Special Police (BSP), a volunteer police force serving the City of Buffalo, New York, is tackling crime at a grassroots level by educating the community on human rights.

The Peace Bridge glows gold and blue in honor of the Buffalo Special Police Force and their commitment to human rights education.
The Peace Bridge glows gold and blue in honor of the Buffalo Special Police Force commitment to human rights.
(Photo by Gerri Jones)

BSP chief Ted Hampton sees a crucial need to address human rights citywide: “I believe that there is a direct correlation between crime and the lack of information regarding human rights,” he says. “We are involved because there is much more to be done. As the BSP, that prides itself as a boots-on-the-ground organization, we believe that there is an immediate necessity to take the message of human rights directly to the streets. This message is universal and crosses all borders.”

Members of the Buffalo Special Police and the Buffalo chapter of Youth for Human Rights gather at the Peace Bridge April 16, 2017, to watch the bridge lit in the BPS’s colors to symbolize their commitment to human rights education.
Members of the Buffalo Special Police and the Buffalo chapter of Youth for Human Rights gather at the Peace Bridge April 16, 2017, to watch the lighting of the bridge in the BPS’s colors to symbolize their work in human rights education.

An international bridge between Canada and the USA opened in 1927, the bridge was named to commemorate 100 years of peace between the two countries. Chief Hampton believes an understanding of human rights is essential to peace on our streets and chose the bridge as a fitting symbol of the impact human rights education can have in Buffalo and the BSP’s intent to making this happen.

Chief Hampton and a team of his officers were trained to deliver human rights education by the Buffalo Chapter of Youth for Human Rights, the youth component of United for Human Rights.

“I am truly impressed with these materials,” says Hampton. “I only wish I had done this program sooner.”

His enthusiasm comes from the BSP’s work introducing people to the 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and seeing the impact of this knowledge on their self-esteem and behavior. “They have a different understanding about themselves and others,” says Hampton. “It is this knowledge that creates advocates and we want to do everything we can to help create an entire community of advocates.”

The Buffalo Special Police is an all-volunteer organization, serving Buffalo since 1927. Working in coordination with the Buffalo Police, they preserve the rights of citizens while increasing safety in the city. BSP members are academy-trained officers who have received more than 150 hours of mandated training, including in the use of firearms. Members are approved and certified through the Municipal Police Training Council.

United for Human Rights (UHR) is an international, not-for-profit organization that unites human rights advocates and groups to promote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. UHR has the purpose to educate, unite and activate people to bring about broad-scale awareness of human rights.

United for Human Rights Buffalo and the Buffalo chapter of Youth for Human Rights deliver training and provide these award-winning materials free of charge to educators, law enforcement and community and religious organizations in Western New York and surrounding states. They also deliver seminars to businesses, groups, clubs and educators. For more information, visit the website of the Buffalo chapter of Youth for Human Rights.

The Church of Scientology and Scientologists support United for Human Rights and Youth for Human Rights International, whose award-winning educational materials are translated into 27 languages, bringing the message of human rights to 195 nations.

The Scientology religion was founded by author and philosopher L. Ron Hubbard. The first Church of Scientology was formed in Los Angeles in 1954 and the religion has expanded to more than 11,000 Churches, Missions and affiliated groups, with millions of members in 167 countries.

CONTACT:
Church of Scientology Media Relations
mediarelations@churchofscientology.net
(323) 960-3500 phone
(323) 960-3508 fax